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The Real Reason We Are Here


Friday, March 1, 2013

Hey everyone! Since it’s midterms week, I'll keep this post a little shorter than normal. I am really busy with my schoolwork right now, so it’s only fitting that I talk about my experience with academics and give some advice to new students. (I promise it won't be as boring as you might think!)

A typical degree at Young Harris College has around 120 total academic credit hours. That equals at least 15 hours each semester to graduate in four years. There are always summer classes if you would like to take a lighter load during some semesters. Classes are typically held on Monday, Wednesday and Friday for 50 minutes or on Tuesday and Thursday for 90 minutes. There are some exceptions to this, of course, as some classes are only one day a week – especially longer, more intensive science labs or art studio classes. Core courses like English, history and business are generally three academic credit hours, but courses can range between one and four credits depending on the subject.

I enjoy nearly all of my classes and love my professors. Speaking of professors, they pretty much make the academic life at Young Harris College great. Class sizes are small (generally around 17 students), so professors get to know all of us well. They also know if you miss class, so no skipping! Professors are really cool in and outside of the classroom. They maintain a professional relationship but are also fun and lighthearted, too. They absolutely care about the well being of their students. All of them have office hours to give us extra help when we need it, and most professors have an “open door policy” meaning students are welcome to simply stop by.

I am not going to lie. Classes are difficult. Academics are definitely a big step up from high school courses, but they are doable. If you do your homework, show up to class and work closely with your professors to learn the material, you will succeed in college. Don't freak out when you fail a test either, because it will happen sooner or later. Just use it as motivation to ask for help, keep going and do better on the next one.

Until next week, I better get going on some of my coursework instead of just talking about it! I have a chemistry test coming up and a study session with friends tonight. Talk to you next week!

Peace,

Corey Helton